Business

Are You Falling At The First Hurdle? How To Make The Right Impression Every Time

Chloe Harwood
Written by Chloe Harwood

Whatever type of business you run, first impressions count for everything. When you’re trying to impress customers, close deals or attract new clients or investors, it’s rare to get a second chance. If you’ve been struggling to get over the first hurdle, it could be because you’re not impressing from the outset. If you own a company and you’re keen to improve your performance, here are some of the ways you can make the right impression every time.

Personal presentation

Many company owners take an active role in the day to day running of the business, and they play an instrumental part in securing funding, driving sales and forming relationships. If you’re involved in interacting with potential investors, the media or clients, you have to recognize the importance of the role you play. You are a walking advertisement for your business and your brand. If people buy into what you’re saying or offering, you’re going to go far. If they don’t, you’re going to struggle, even if you’re got a brilliant sales team. If you’ve got a meeting coming up or the chance to pitch to buyers or get new clients on board, always ensure that you look the part. Did you know that the average human forms an impression of a new person in just 7 seconds? Dress smartly, rehearse and show the audience how passionate you are about the business and how much you want to succeed. If you want money or custom, you have to be able to persuade others of your capability, your dedication and your ability to make this venture a success.

Branding

Branding is about giving your business an identity. Think about the brands you buy every day, or you’ve trusted for years. What makes you buy those products or choose the same brand every time? The branding techniques you use should encapsulate everything that your company is about, so think carefully when you’re designing logos, coming up with straplines or designing merchandise that carries your name. For some top branding tips, you may find this page useful https://www.entrepreneur.com/article/276520. The best brands have strong identities, which enables you to point them out and name them just by seeing the logo or the motto.

Your business premises

Whether you’re based at an office, you run a restaurant, a shop or a construction business, it’s important that your work premises look the part. In some cases, aesthetics will be more important than others, for example, if you have a shop, a cafe or a bar. You want people to walk up the street and notice your shop window and want to see more. Even if you don’t run a business that involves interacting with customers face to face, it’s still important to pay attention to the appearance of your premises. If you’ve got an office with paint peeling off the walls or a unit with roof tiles sliding off, this isn’t going to give potential clients or investors the best impression. Take a look at options like www.WildWoodRoof.com/commercial-roof-repair work for details of commercial roof repairs and investigate local maintenance agencies if you have issues like broken gates or doors, chipped paintwork or blocked guttering. If you do own a business that involves offering a service, such as a salon, a beauty clinic or a hotel, and you think the look of the premises is letting you down, consider a revamp. Search for inspiration online, check out some magazines and see what other firms have done.

Your team

Just as it’s essential that you look the part, it’s also important that anyone who acts on your behalf also recognizes that they’re part of the marketing strategy. Whether you employ a fleet of drivers or a team of stylists, engineers or sales representatives, every person has a duty to promote the company in the best way possible. From the way they dress to the way they behave, it’s so important that every person is on the same page. Encourage punctuality and professionalism, and carry out checks to make sure that everybody is doing their bit. If you are sending people out to secure new business or strengthen existing ties, ensure you have the best people for the job. If you don’t have experienced salespeople or those with expertise in public speaking, consider hiring candidates with these skills. A pitch could make or break you.

Customer feedback

As a business manager, you should show customers that you care. If you have closed a deal with a new client, you may not have fallen at the first hurdle, but you may stumble at the next. Show your customers that you value them, take the time to listen to them, and utilize the feedback that they provide. If they’re giving you comments, and you’re ignoring them, why should they choose you again?

Business events and roadshows

Business events like trade exhibitions and roadshows are an excellent opportunity to sell your business and show people what you’re all about and how you could benefit them. Remember that in this arena, you’re competing to capture people’s imaginations and draw them in. You’ll be up against a number of other companies, all vying for the attention of the crowd. Make sure your stall stands out, work on the visual appeal, and ensure that you’ve rehearsed your sales pitch for when clients ask questions and want to learn more about the product. Show off what you’re selling, let people have a go, and try and be flexible when it comes to negotiating deals. If the stand looks bland, there are no interactive features, and you can’t offer incentives, there’s very little for potential customers to shout about.

Are you finding it difficult to climb over the first hurdle? Are you struggling to turn leads into sales or are rival firms beating you to new clients? First impressions are essential in business, and it’s estimated that you’ve only got 7 seconds to impress. Take these tips on board to make your business more appealing and dynamic. Focus on your role as the boss, get everyone else on board, build a strong brand and ensure that anything that carries your logo or brand name fits the bill.

About the author

Chloe Harwood

Chloe Harwood